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Laddering

The term laddering refers to the various things that depend from industry to industry. Most commonly it is used in order to describe retirement planning and money saving. It can include underwriting of new securities and repurchase of the less volatile ones.

Laddering explained

Laddering is a method of investing, in which an investor buys several financial instruments with different maturities. See also laddering in marketing.

Laddering is not subject to the interest rate risk of reinvesting a large portion of assets in an unfavorable financial environment. For example, a person has deposit bonds that mature in 2015 and 2018. If the interest rate drops quite a bit on the 2015 bonds, half of the income is locked in until 2018.

Laddering can free up capital when necessary. A person can buy shorter-term bonds if he or she needs funds in the near future to finance, for example, children's education, or buy longer-term bonds that will mature much later and not need immediate expenses, in a situation where the economy is favorable to earnings.

This laddering strategy is useful for a diversified portfolio, with other assets in the stock market, etc. It usually requires an initial investment of $10,000 to $20,000 to buy 5 to 10 bonds with different maturities for a specific term.

Laddering also describes a process where in order to buy a stake at a certain price, investors must also agree to buy additional stakes at a higher price. This artificially inflates the price of equity and allows initiates to buy at a lower price with the guarantee that they can sell at a higher price. This practice is illegal. This practice led to an SEC investigation of national and world banks after the stock market crash.

The laddering scheme also describes a process in which in order to buy shares at a given price, investors must also agree to buy additional shares at a higher price. This artificially inflates the stock price and allows insiders to buy at a lower price with the assurance that they can sell at a higher price. This practice led to SEC investigations of national and global banks after the stock market crash.

Laddering is a tactic of investing money in which it is invested in financial instruments with different maturities. This is where the term comes from - investments are made in steps, the height of each step (maturity of the investment) being higher than the previous one.

A simple example of underwriting is buying bonds of the same issuer, but with different maturities. Let's say by purchasing government bonds maturing in 2018, 2019 and 2020, an investor builds that very laddering. What does that get him?

Well, first of all, building such laddering allows you to diversify your investments somewhat, far from fully, because the object of investment in this case is only one. But, nevertheless, it allows you to insure to a certain extent against adverse interest rate changes. For example, if the rate decreases by 2019, the investor will take his profits for 2018 (with a higher interest rate). Then he can reinvest the proceeds in more profitable properties. And the interest rate, by the way, can then rise again, allowing for larger profits on later bonds.

Secondly, as mentioned above, the advantage of this laddering approach is the incremental release of cash. This can be used both for reinvestment and for planned investments (e.g., to expand one's home or for children's education).

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